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The Artist’s Lens 2023:

Manifesting the Hidden

A Group Photography Exhibition as part of

Exposure

Dates

January 5, 2023– February 25, 2023

 

Venue

The Alberta Society of Artists
Lower Gallery

1235 26 Ave SE

Calgary, AB

T2G1R7

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The Alberta Society of Artists is excited to exhibit, “The Artist’s Lens 2023: Manifesting the Hidden“, as part of 2023 Exposure, Alberta’s Photography Festival. This exhibition is composed of artistic works where photography is integral to the works, from Artists throughout Alberta. All presented works were selected from submissions to the Alberta Society of Artists’ call by a blind Jury.

Artists were asked to explore ideas of the hidden and intangible; inspired by aesthetics such as; atmospheric, ‘other worldly’, mysticism, romanticism, mystery, nostalgia, horror, the macabre, apocalyptic, and alien. Works can focus on but not limited to the idea of the bedroom, the ocean, space, dreams, the subconscious and the surreal.

The Artists

Artists are listed alphabetically by First Name. Artist’s name followed by “ASA” denotes a Juried or Life Member of the Alberta Society of Artists (ASA).

  • AJ Kluck
  • Alexis Marie Chute
  • Angela Boehm
  • Barb Kreutter, ASA
  • Gary Sinclair
  • Gerry Dotto
  • Jordan Mudrack
  • Karen Ho Fatt
  • Kire Kire
  • Laurie Odnokon
  • Michael Larocque
  • Mitra Samavaki
  • Nozomi Kamei
  • Peter Moller
  • Renee Mutch
  • Wendy Passmore-Godfrey

See the exhibition works, including the Artists’ statements below. Use the arrows on the left and right sides to navigate through the 24 works, or use the small dots below the images to jump forward.

Head Game

The hidden is revealed, what is on the inside made visible. We all carry so much, are so visually stimulated, and here we can appreciate the layered complexity of our inner workings portrayed on the outside. This image is about mental wellness and identity.

Head Game (2022)
Alexis Marie Chute
Photography and digital drawing
36 in. x 24 in.

Skin

Portrait and poem about the body and the secrets it carries.

it holds you together / it blues with winter / flushes in love

you stretch it at the lobe / low aching pain a pleasure

it stretches elsewhere / lightning white

you write on it / forever black words

lines that morph as you / expand and contract

in the world / it is your coat of armour

and your warm embrace

Skin (2022)
Alexis Marie Chute
Photography and Text
36 in. x 24 in.

Ghost

My practice explores time, history, memory and the invisible. The landscape is the source of inspiration and the framework in which these themes are investigated. The medium of photography can reveal and conceal, the invisible is made visible. Trace, memory and the passage of time are synthesized into thematic and poetic layers in the expression of the final piece; the solemnity, beauty and chaos in death is revealed.

Ghost (2013)
Karen Ho Fatt
Photography
36 in. x 22 in.

Soul

My practice explores time, history, memory and the invisible. The landscape is the source of inspiration and the framework in which these themes are investigated. The medium of photography can reveal and conceal, the invisible is made visible. Trace, memory and the passage of time are synthesized into thematic and poetic layers in the expression of the final piece; the solemnity, beauty and chaos in death is revealed.

Soul (2013)
Karen Ho Fatt
Photography
36 in. x 22 in.

Home-coming

“Home-Coming” is part of my photographic exploration of Calgary, rooted in my experience of migration. It explores how time and the medium of photography can be used to generate new memories and make new roots in a place that is not yet home. I am influenced by Pictorialist photographers of the late nineteen century. Metaphorically, this experimental process parallels my experience as an immigrant in Canada. Photographic images, and specifically Platinum prints, are very stable, but memories are not. We might recall some memories accurately, while some parts have been changed or forgotten. Similar to my experience, this photograph lives on a threshold, existing between incompleteness and becoming whole.

Home-Comming (2022)
Mitra Samavaki
Platinum print from a digital photograph
8 in. x 10 in.

Home-coming

“Home-Coming” is part of my photographic exploration of Calgary, rooted in my experience of migration. It explores how time and the medium of photography can be used to generate new memories and make new roots in a place that is not yet home. I am influenced by Pictorialist photographers of the late nineteen century. Metaphorically, this experimental process parallels my experience as an immigrant in Canada. Photographic images, and specifically Platinum prints, are very stable, but memories are not. We might recall some memories accurately, while some parts have been changed or forgotten. Similar to my experience, this photograph lives on a threshold, existing between incompleteness and becoming whole.

Home-Comming (2022)
Mitra Samavaki
Platinum print from a digital photograph
8 in. x 10 in.

The Three Lives of a Plant

Three versions of a plant, real, shadow and reflection, somehow conjured from the same angle of perspective. All captured at the same moment, in such mystery, photography plays. It was not a set up.

The Three Lives of a Plant (2021)
Kire Kire
Photography
11 in. x 14 in.

Michael Green, Coyote, 1991

This drawing is based on a series of photographs used in a poster I created for One Yellow Rabbit’s production “The Land, The Animals” in 1991. Michael Green, trickster, tinker, theatre impresario, collaborator, friend. Michael’s Irish roots showed him to be a true Traveller, a tinker which is to say, a mischievous and playful person. His work with the Treaty 7 Project near the end of his life certainly fit the ‘coyote’ persona… trickster. Michael took great pride in his given Blackfoot name Elk Shadow, but I like to think that I knew him first as a coyote.

Michael Green, Coyote, 1991 (2022)
Peter Moller
Charcoal, pastels on paper
36 in. x 28 in.

Lost Road

Life and winter storms have immeasurable beauty, a careful edge, fragility, softened with time, both end and start. The obscured horizon becomes a stage with a curtain of blowing snow. Concrete forms become softened, lost in the snow smouldering field, a history trying to take shape. The blowing snow is covering things in, washing away colour, laying a cover over what has taken place here. Winter storms are like memories. Footsteps are quickly covered, but the world does not stop, always new footsteps, quickly covered, new histories appear. The endlessness of the world is here. While exploring our collective connection to memory I returned to my childhood home in Saskatchewan. It is here in the harshest of prairie winter storms, that I continue to create images for this series.

Lost Road (2022)
Angela Boehm
Medium Format Digital on Bamboo
27 in. x 36 in.

Impulse

Barb’s practice as an artist is focused on expressionistic abstract images. She focuses on how the environment in front of her makes her feel and less on documenting what she is seeing. When creating images of the Urban landscape, she is drawn to both the geometry and forms of the environment. In our current urban landscape, there is so much of the chaos of daily life that is hidden within.

Impulse (2022)
Barb Kreutter, ASA
Photograph
16 in. x 16 in.

The Reincarnated Edge

Barb’s practice as an artist is focused on expressionistic abstract images. She focuses on how the environment in front of her makes her feel and less on documenting what she is seeing. When creating images of the Urban landscape, she is drawn to both the geometry and forms of the environment. In our current urban landscape, there is so much of the chaos of daily life that is hidden within.

The Reincarnated Edge (2022)
Barb Kreutter, ASA
Photograph
16 in. x 16 in.

Unlock the Hidden

Water has always fascinated me. This transparent, fluid, and amorphous medium has so many hidden and unexpected manifestations. Turbulent streams dashing over rocky riverbeds with airy sprays create a cacophony of sensory experiences: visual, auditory, and olfactory. In this manipulated, digital work I allegorically connect these physical properties to that unique emotional interaction that unlocks the veiled reality revealed only by one’s unique key to unbridled imagination.

Unlock the Hidden (2022)
Gary Sinclair
Photograph
11 in. x 14 in.

Self Portrait with Taxi

This is my reflection in the front window of a downtown Vancouver business. The interior’s been gutted and debris is piled in the middle of the room. The reflection isn’t clear at first, but the trail of debris leads your eye to the shadows and details slowly reveal themselves hands, a figure, a taxi emerging from the debris. When I shoot a self portrait, I imbue it with a certain duality – that of my presence and my absence existing in the same space. I’m revealing myself as the subject of the photo, but at the same time I’m also trying to hide myself within the image.

Self Portrait with Taxi (2022)
Gerry Dotto
Photograph, C-print on photo paper
26.25 in. x 27 in.

Self Portrait, Conference Centre Washroom, Level 2, West Edmonton Mall (from the series ‘Self Portraits in Public Washrooms’)

This is my reflection in the mirror of a public washroom at a conference centre. The idea to photograph myself in public washrooms came from the notion of what better place to take a self portrait than a room full of mirrors. But there could be hazards to this notion – bringing a camera into a space where everyone’s looking for privacy can have the appearance of wrong-doing. So I try not to look suspicious. Taking the photo, I position myself so that my reflection is hiding in the crack between mirrors. I’m creating the duality of my presence and my absence existing in the same space. I’m revealing myself as the subject of the photo, but at the same time I’m also trying to hide myself within the image.

Self Portrait, Conference Centre Washroom, Level 2, West Edmonton Mall
(from the series ‘Self Portraits in Public Washrooms’)
(2022)
Gerry Dotto
Photograph, C-print on photo paper
22.25 in. x 27 in.

102922A

With this series, I wanted to showcase my take on Rorschach tests by using ink and a similar yet unique, method of ink pour photography. I created these on a much smaller scale that resulted in some grand results. Using ink drops in water and a macro lens to capture the eccentricity of movement, I mirrored the drops to create some otherworldly visuals. I want each individual to view these photos without my hinderance and experience them on their own.

102922A (2022)
Jordan Mudrack
Photography
16 in. x 24 in.

102922B

With this series, I wanted to showcase my take on Rorschach tests by using ink and a similar yet unique, method of ink pour photography. I created these on a much smaller scale that resulted in some grand results. Using ink drops in water and a macro lens to capture the eccentricity of movement, I mirrored the drops to create some otherworldly visuals. I want each individual to view these photos without my hinderance and experience them on their own.

102922B (2022)
Jordan Mudrack
Photography
16 in. x 24 in.

Walking On Ocean Blvd

Driftwood creates beautiful puzzles and patterns when it washes up on the beach. The shapes and textures create mysterious compositions and prompt questions about what they were in a previous life. I experimented with intensifying the colours to bring out small details, shapes and lines to add to the mystery about what is in the photograph.

Walking On Ocean Blvd (2022)
Laurie Odnokon
Photograph
15.75 in. x 12 in.

West Coast Drift

Driftwood on the beach becomes a mysterious collection of shapes, lines and textures. I look for unusual compositions in the environment that cause the viewer to stop and look. I want them to see the beauty and mystery in something common place. This piece allows the viewer to interpret it in different ways. Is it a collection of strange faces or flowing swirls of alien patterns? I emphasized the shadows to add to the mystery.

West Coast Drift (2022)
Laurie Odnokon
Photograph
15.75 in. x 12 in.

Codes

The unique lines created by the trees and shadows of the trees appear as unique codes to me. My friend told me that trees talk. If we learn to listen to the trees, we will be able to listen to what they say. I am curious to know their message.

Codes (2021)
Nozomi Kamei
photography on canvas
12 in. x 18 in.

The Call of Artemis

I once only saw shadows cast by flickering votive candles sat in red glass. Now, I see moonlight illuminating the left-hand path ahead, holding hands with the women in my life, prayers sent to the gods of old. I hear my ancestors calling my name, celebrating through the mists of time. They are proud as I stand on the forest floor, Nikon in hand, that the last daughter of their line moves through the world on her own. My photography calls me to work with people in places that I would have never dreamt possible only ten years ago.

The Call of Artemis (2022)
Renee Mutch
photography on canvas
124in. x 18 in.

Mill Pond in the Morning

A story has suspense, surprise and dénouement. A chance encounter, a happy accident, a twist of plot, an unintended outcome. What if? The hair on the back of my neck rises. Who is peeking from between the branches? The smell of wet trees pressing down their collar? Who’s there? Even a peaceful scene is suspiciously quiet and tranquil. I brace myself for a surprise. Either a slow seep of ominous understanding……or a sudden watery eruption from the memories of the pond’s deepest pools.

Mill Pond in the Morning (2014)
Wendy Passmore-Godfrey
Digital Photo
5.5 in. x 8 in.