Earth

Alberta Society Of Artists

Over a four-year period, the ASA invited submissions to the respective exhibitions Fire, Water, and Air, concluding the series with Earth. The theme can be understood in many ways. There is the earth itself, there are views of the earth, including satellite views. The abuse of the earth. The use of earth e.g. clay or sand in the art process itself was also welcomed.

Brent Laycock
Landform: Canyon
24×24″
Acrylic

The natural forces at work on the substances of the earth exhibit sensational qualities of time and patience.  Given the right opportunity, occasional bursts of water can cut deep gorges and canyons into hard rock.  Change is constant, and eventually the results can be dramatic.  This image grew out of an imaginative exploration of the idea of “canyon”, a place where time, rain, light and sunlight conspire to pierce the crust of our planet.

© Brent R. Laycock

Ilse Anysas-Salkauskas
You Can See Forever
21×21.5″
Textiles

In some parts of Alberta you can be led to believe that the Earth is flat because you can see for miles and miles.

© Ilse Anysas-Salkauskas

Deborah Lougheed-Sinclair
Earth Uncovered
12×18″ 
Digital art on paper

Here in the Pacific Northwest, the earth groans and sighs under the weight of glaciers’ thick ice. Rainbow rock, a signature of the ancient past uncovered by the retreating ice, appears as a river of colour. Volcanic rhyolite with veins of calcite allophones sculpted by ice, water, and wind has transformed into smooth flowing forms. Now, new life clings and takes root here as if shouting out “I am alive!

©Deborah Lougheed-Sinclair

Stan Phelps
Contemplation of the Muses – Armageddon at Gridlock
15×12″
Intaglio etching on d-Arche paper

Amidst global warming, the sky opens, the oceans rise up and our houses of cards fall asunder.

This etching is part of an ongoing series which uses carousels and clocks as symbols and the harlequin/jester to mock man’s obsession with monumentalizing earthly achievements.

As the “Muses” contemplate, nature reclaims its terrain, and we become but an evolutionary experiment gone bad.

© Stan Phelps

Jack Blair 
Mourning Mist
18×24.5″
Photographic print

Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust. For some, these words will be spoken at their burial. Some will chose to have their ashes scattered on water, at a place that they loved or were loved.

Many of us, “of a certain age” as they say, will chose to rest for all eternity, looking at the roots of the grasses that cover us.

For me, there is something comforting about being held forever by Mother Earth.

© Jack Blair

David Harrison
Fault Lines And Epicentres
Watercolour and Mixed Media
16×13″

Visiting my west coast family I am always impressed at how my young grandsons are prepared both at school and at home for an eventual seismic event. Preparedness is part of their vocabulary and is regularly practiced.

Over the past few years, while visiting my family, there have been minor tremors which nevertheless cause consternation.

 My submission is based upon the science of mapping fault lines, fractures and epicentres in predicting the earth’s destructive forces.

© David Harrison

Karen Blanchet
My Rock / Mon Rocher
Mixed Media
30×30″

Following the path to Edith Cavell, left us breathless and wonder-filled. My preferred vistas are hidden, unnoticed corners rather than the usual panoramas. Rocks fascinate me. Endlessly varied in colour and form they provide a convincing display of solidity. Nestled in the shelter of a significant evergreen, this rock has a story to tell. In fact, more than one. The language is unfamiliar yet understandable. It is all about praise and being. Would that I could do the same with such ease.

© David Harrison

Carole Bondaroff
Damaged By The Flood
Multi-plate intaglio etching with chine colle
30×22″

This print is part of a series of etchings which I have been creating that deals with the effects of global warming; the radical climatic changes resulting in cataclysmic weather events.

The large, central sphere represents the EARTH, the four upper images depict the phases of the moon, and the two lower, photo-etched images portray the City of Calgary during the flood of 2013. This intaglio, multi-plate etching (on Buff d’Arches Paper) with chine collé (Washi Paper) was produced at Atelier de l’Ile, Québec.

© Carole Bondaroff

Deborah Lougheed-Sinclair
Earth’s Scars
Digital Art on paper
12×18″

Abandoned in Earth’s northern wilderness, these fishing vessels are now but ghosts of mankind’s presence here. Echoes of our past “glory” are slowly fading but still blight. Water, wind, rot, and decay shape and transform. Though still scarred, nature will slowly reclaim most of this shoreline once again.

© Deborah Lougheed-Sinclair

Robyn MacKay
Wood Gathering
Photographic image print/transfer on pressed and dried leaf
10×12″

This photograph was captured while cycling through remote Northern India. The image transfer-printed on a real dried leaf represents the many gifts that the earth provides. For the nomads of the remote Himalayan mountains, gathering and carrying naturally dried wood is a daily activity that supplies warmth and cooking fuel, giving life and connecting their spiritual oneness to Mother Earth.

© Robyn MacKay

Robyn MacKay
Bountiful Earth
Photographic image print/transfer onto 3D wood box, acrylic paint and pens
12x12x12″

This 3D wooden box has photographic images printed and transferred onto each side. The images captured represent one of the many resources that the earth provides humans for sustenance, life, and happiness. The leaf pickers of Assam India are gifted with the bounties of the earth giving them employment and livelihood, and yielding a crop of delicious tea.

© Robyn MacKay

Jack Blair
Black Gold Of The Prairie
Photographic print
20×24.5″

Farmers know the earth.  They are stewards of the land.

They’ve scooped it with their hands, dug it with their spades, ploughed it with their horses and cultivator, driven over it in their tractors, and cried as they watched it leave in a wind storm.  The earth is the foundation of almost everything we eat and it is the farmer who we trust with its care.  Some talk of oil as black gold, but others would have us think of the dirt in the fields as the black gold of the prairies.

© Jack Blair

Denis Gadbois
Pele Hand
Canvas photo paper of wood frame
24×24″

Hawaii Island also known as the big Island is the largest active volcano on Earth.  Pele  is the name of the God of all volcano in the Island and control the flow of the volcanos. Using actual lava flow of the last eruption (2018), I was able to portray lava as an hand, as it was grabbing vegetation, trees and roads in its path.  This photo is not manipulated other than altering the projection of the 360 image capture on a pole.  Visualization is key for me as an artist.

© Dennis Gadbois

Doro Buch
From The Bird’s Eye View
Oil on round canvas board
24″

You see the earth from a bird’s perspective. From above fields, topographic, rivers become blurred in to abstract geometrical forms. The painting focus on aspects of migration and its related themes such as finding a new place to rest and exploring something new.

Inspired by the paintings of the Expressionists in the early 20th century I assemble realities with abstracted forms and vibrant, mostly bright, pure colours. The forms and the colors are chosen to support the indented topic of the work.

© Doro Buch

Dale Beaven
BeeWare
Acrylic on canvas
23.5×31.5″

Speaking to a recently retired new neighbour, I mentioned searching for inspiration for a show, “Earth.” He was a provincial agronomist in Central Alberta in a very large area most of his career. When I asked what was the most profound change he witnessed over that time and space without hesitation he said “The effect on the insects”.

Climate change, loss of habitat, decimation of host planets, insecticides and herbicides: all contribute to the continuing decline of our insect biodiversity. None is more vital than the subject I chose, the wild honey bee, carrying the future of our planet Earth.

© Dale Beaven

Wendy Borglum
Elements 1
Acrylic, modelling paste, string gel, and beads on gallery-wrap canvas
24×18″

“Elements 1” is a work that conveys power, energy, age, and textural or topographic interest. It resembles a satellite view of the earth but is a completely abstract painting. I chose a limited palette and set about creating and layering texture and colour in a very free, organic way—letting each step and development evolve. Forms and design began to emerge and I started to assert control over the direction–manipulating and becoming bolder with colour, value, and texture to create the finished work.

© Wendy Borglum

Wendy Borglum
Dawn Of Spring
Acrylic, modelling paste, pumice, and sand on gallery wrap canvas
30×24″

Dawn of Spring portrays a morning forest scene with the soft subtle colours and light of spring as the snow is melting and the earth awakens to a new season. It conveys an enjoyment of texture, colour theory, and abstraction combined with representation. The painting incorporates elements of earth such as pumice and sand, in addition to modelling paste, to add body and interest to the tree trunks and background. It reflects my personal enjoyment of living in, and painting in, the moment.

 

© Wendy Borglum

Rachel Prins
Stack #2
Acrylic on canvas
20×20″

Both playful and thoughtful, my work references the natural world using organic forms arranged in a variety of ways on the canvas. Stack #2 is part of an ongoing series where I create cairn-like arrangements. Cairns are earth-based path markers used for finding your way along a trail. With the future often unpredictable it feels increasingly necessary to know our on paths and find ways to stay grounded. These artworks represent creating path markers in an uncertain world.

© Rachel Prins

Rachel Prins
Stack #1
Acrylic on canvas
20×20″

Both playful and thoughtful, my work references the natural world using organic forms arranged in a variety of ways on the canvas. Stack #2 is part of an ongoing series where I create cairn-like arrangements. Cairns are earth-based path markers used for finding your way along a trail. With the future often unpredictable it feels increasingly necessary to know our on paths and find ways to stay grounded. These artworks represent creating path markers in an uncertain world.

© Rachel Prins

Yvonne DuBourdieu
Mastery
Oil on canvas
36×24″

Earth, this place where we live, filled with the dichotomies of nature, reverberates with all its beauty and flaws through our human existence. It is what sustains us and threatens us in equal measure. Exploring ideas around earthly dwelling and human psyche I have created a series of storied pieces centered around a young girl. In this piece my intent is to capture a sense of courage, fortitude and prowess. Mastery – Rooted firmly on the edge of her world, she wrangles with all her strength and determination to hold back the forces that threaten her.

© Yvonne DuBourdieu

Brent Laycock
Landform: Cliff
Acrylic
24×24″

Living on the surface of the planet Earth, we observe various landforms created by the natural forces that have been at work moving, eroding and shaping the dirt and rock around us.  In some places, water erodes the elements and creates steep cliffs. My goal was to use the visual shapes, lines and shadows to launch an abstracted composition inspired by this type of formation.  It then becomes a visual statement about the general idea of a cliff rather than a specific place.

© Brent Laycock

Yvonne DuBourdieu
Dominion
Oil on canvas
36×24″

Earth, this place where we live, filled with the dichotomies of nature, reverberates with all its beauty and flaws through our human existence. It is what sustains us and threatens us in equal measure. Exploring ideas around earthly dwelling and human psyche I created a series of storied pieces centred around a girl. In this piece my intent is to capture a sense of freedom, energy and hope. Dominion – At the top of her world, standing firmly on her own two feet, she finds a serine strength and surrenders to the forces outwith her control to trust what will be.

© Yvonne DuBourdieu

David Cadman
The Square Root Of Purple
Acrylic
28×20″

My concept was to portray the importance of a strong root system able to penetrate the earth in search of nutrients to sustain the tree.

I wanted to bring attention to the roots by showing them on a background of two squares, one purple. As it turns out some people have tried to fine the square root of purple and some authors from a NASA funded research claim that life forms of early earth were retinal based rather than chlorophyll based, making earth appear purple rather than green.

© David Cadman